113th Infantry

This article on the 113th Infantry will provide you with an overview of the Regiment’s service during the First World War and help you research those who served with it. I have written a separate article on the war-raised 2nd Battalion 113th Infantry and a series of guides to help you research soldiers who served in the Indian Army during the war. To view the guides click on the links below:

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113th Infantry in the First World War

Lineage: Raised as the 1st Battalion, 7th Regiment of Bombay Native Infantry in 1800 and became the 13th Regiment of Bombay Native Infantry in 1824. Then the 13th Regiment of Bombay Infantry in 1885, the 13th Bombay Infantry in 1901, the 113th Infantry in 1903 and the 6th Battalion 4th Bombay Grenadiers in 1922.

Composition in 1914: 2 Companies of Western Rajputana Jats, 2 Companies of Bagri Jats and Jats from Eastern Rajputana, 2 Companies of Rajputana Gujars and 2 Companies of Punjabi Musalmans. 1919: 1 Company of Western Rajputana Jats, 1 Company of Bagri Jats and Jats from Eastern Rajputana, 1 Company of Rajputana Gujars and 1 Company of Punjabi Musalmans.

Location in July 1914: The 113th Infantry was stationed at Dibrugarh (Assam, India) having arrived from Deesa (Gujarat, India) on 10th January 1914. Detachments at Buksa Duar, Gantok, Gyantse and Yatung.

The 113th Infantry was stationed at Dibrugarh (Assam, India) in August 1914 and was inspected by Major-General K. S. Davison, Commanding Nasiraba Brigade in its 1913-14 confidential report who reported:

Turn-out: Clean and smart.

Efficiency in drill and manoeuvres: Satisfactory.

Musketry: Above the average.

General efficiency: Quite satisfactory; Regiment fit for active service.

Personnel: British officers have a good knowledge of their work and are fit for the positions they severally hold; Indian ranks are of good physique, well trained and appear to be loyal and contented.

Confidential review reports on Indian Army units for 1913-1914IOR/L/MIL/7/17023

The extract below was taken October 1914 Indian Army List which recorded the British officers serving with the Regiment.113th Infantry British Officers 1914On 19 March 1917, the 113th Infantry left Dargai, North West Frontier Province (Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan) and travelled by train to Karachi. Arriving at the port on 22 March, the Regiment embarked on board the Hired Transport Khosrou which sailed for Mesopotamia (Iraq) on 24 March. The 113th Infantry disembarked at Basra on 31 March 1917 and moved into camp at Magil. The Regiment spent its first months in Mesopotamia on the line of communication and on outpost duties before being attached to the 52nd Brigade, 17th Indian Division in September 1917 in which it served for the next two years. The 113th Infantry had rather an uneventful service in Mesopotamia until the 1920 Iraqi Revolt. The 113th Infantry returned to India either in late 1920 or early 1921 and was stationed at Ajmer (Rajasthan, India) in the July 1921 Indian Army List. In 1922, the 113th Infantry became the 6th Battalion 4th Bombay Grenadiers. The 113th Infantry raised a second battalion during the war and I have written a separate article about it here: 2nd Battalion 113th Infantry.

Due to its part in the suppression of the 1920 Iraqi Revolt and operations in Kurdistan, the 113th Infantry qualified for the General Service Medal with Iraq and Kurdistan Clasps. The Medal Index Cards for the General Service Medal with can be viewed on Ancestry or downloaded from the National Archives’ website. I’d recommend viewing the cards on Ancestry as they are free and in colour.

War Diaries of the 113th Infantry

There are three war diaries for the 113th infantry and all have been digitised by the National Archives. To download the war diaries for a small fee click on the blue links below.

  • Date: 01 March 1917 – 28 February 1918
  • 52nd Indian Infantry Brigade, 17th Indian Division, Mesopotamia
  • Reference: WO95/5213/8
  • Notes: An average war diary. There are a large number of appendices include regimental, embarkation and disembarkation orders etc. Also, a list of men including their regimental numbers who were to be attached to a machine gun company dated 25 May 1917.
  • Date: 01 March – 31 October 1918
  • 52nd Indian Infantry Brigade, 17th Indian Division, Mesopotamia
  • Reference: WO95/5213/9
  • Notes: Another average war diary. There is a nominal roll of British officers serving with the 113th Infantry at the end of each month from March 1918 to October 1918. Also, a list of casualties sustained by the Regiment on 22 October 1918 and a list of men who were “noted for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty”.
  • Date: 01 November 1918 – 31 October 1920
  • 52nd Indian Infantry Brigade, 17th Indian Division, Mesopotamia
  • Reference: WO95/5213/10
  • Notes: An average war diary for the most part, though there are a few lengthier entries for the Iraqi Revolt in 1920. There are a large number of appendices including a variety of orders and nominal rolls of British officers who served with the 113th Infantry at the end of each month.

Further Sources for the 113th Infantry

For information concerning the British and Indian officers who served with the 113th Infantry, the Indian Army List can be consulted. The confidential reports for the 113th Infantry are held at the British Library: Confidential Reports. These reports also contain the annual reports of the British officers serving with the 113th Infantry. Though, when the 113th Infantry is abroad only its Depot and the British officers serving with it are reported on. The Medal Index Cards for the General Service Medal with can be viewed on Ancestry or downloaded from the National Archives’ website. I’d recommend vieweing them on Ancestry as they are free and in colour.

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Extracts from War Diaries of the 113th Infantry

 01 March – 31 October 1918, Mesopotamia, WO95/5213/9

The following names are noted for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on Oct. 22nd 1918.

Capt. and D.C.C. H. Vaughan-Jones under heavy shell fire in the open all day and carried out the duties of Adjt.

Capt. .M. Collins. I.M.S. tended the wounded all day in the open and under heavy shell fire regardless of personal risk.

Sub. Maj. Khudadad Khan, No. 4329 Hav. Nanu Ram, 3766 Hav. Nanu Ram

547 Deufadar. Bostan Khan. 8th Mule Corps. When the first line mules stampeded under heavy shell fire brought them all back and reloaded the scattered loads and took them up under cover and carried up ammunition under fire.

Subadar Risal during the whole time was a magnificent example to the Company, walked about under heavy shell fire and encouraged his men especially when his platoon was shelled out of its trenches and, retired. He urged them to go back and they did so.

Jemadar Hema Ram showed personal gallantry and regardless of risk moved about from trench to trench thereby encouraging all by his example.

No. 4208 Hav Saheb Din, took over command of his platoon when his platoon commander and two other N.C.Os. had been knocked out.

No. 4527 Hav. Sanwat Ram, scout Havildar guided companies on to line during the night, and showed conspicuous courage and inspired all under him.

No. 5221 Hav. Raghubur showed courage throughout and led his men back to their former position after they had retired.

No. 4762 Naik. Sunehi, was an example to his men at a critical time and though wounded refused to go out of the firing line.

No. 4471 Hav. Kana Ram coolness and devotion to duty.

No. 6218. Pte. Bakhtawar stretcher bearer carried wounded and was killed himself on his fourth trip. Recommended for immediate award.

No.5021. Pte. Ramlal although wounded refused to report sick until the end of operations.

No. 6917. Pte. Dola, Ram, bringing in wounded under fire.

No. 5031. Lance Naik Hukam Singh signaller.

All runners carried messaged throughout the day under heavy shell fire with the greatest gallantry and devotion to duty. List of runners as under.

No. 7159, Pte. Rehmat Khan, 6264 Pte. Nawab Khan, 4979 Pte. Chande, 6175 Pte. Nathu, 5269 Pte. Ladu Ram, 5231 Pte. Gangu, 5665 Pte. Puran, 7850 Pte. Darba, 7648 Pte. Firoz Khan, 6218 Pte. Hoti.

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